The Prelude by William Wordsworth, 1805

William Wordsworth visited the Furness Peninsula many times and one of his earlier trips was documented in his autobiographical poem The Prelude. One of the main places spoken about is Furness Abbey and an extract featuring this can be read here:


'Of the day’s journey was too distant far
For any cautious man, a Structure famed
Beyond its neighbourhood, the antique Walls
Of that large Abbey which within the vale
Of Nightshade, to St. Mary’s honour built,
Stands yet, a mouldering Pile, with fractured Arch,
Belfry, and Images, and living Trees,
A holy Scene! along the smooth green turf
Our Horses grazed: to more than inland peace
Left by the sea wind passing overhead
(Though wind of roughest temper) trees and towers
May in that Valley oftentimes be seen,
Both silent and both motionless alike;
Such is the shelter that is there, and such
The safeguard for repose and quietness.

Our steeds remounted, and the summons given,
With whip and spur we by the Chauntry flew
In uncouth race, and left the cross-legg’d Knight,
And the stone-Abbot, and that single Wren
Which one day sang so sweetly in the Nave
Of the old Church, that, though from recent showers
The earth was comfortless, and, touch’d by faint
Internal breezes, sobbings of the place,
And respirations, from the roofless walls
The shuddering ivy dripp’d large drops, yet still,
So sweetly ’mid the gloom the invisible Bird
Sang to itself, that there I could have made
My dwelling-place, and liv’d for ever there
To hear such music. Through the Walls we flew
and down the valley, and a circuit made
In wantonness of heart, through rough and smooth
We scamper’d homeward. Oh! ye Rocks and Streams,
And that still Spirit of the evening air!
Even in this joyous time I sometimes felt
Your presence, when with slacken’d step we breath’d
Along the sides of the steep hills, or when,
Lighted by gleams of moonlight from the sea,
We beat with thundering hoofs the level sand.'


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